Smoke Screening President Obama’s War Crimes

Last Friday night, my Facebook news feed lit up with updates about President Obama’s support for the hotly-debated Cordoba House Islamic Center in New York. My Muslim-American friends, especially, applauded the President for his “bold leadership,” “preservation of American values,” and “defense” of Muslim civil liberties. Somewhere, amidst all the excitement of expressing how “grateful” and “proud” we should be of President Obama, Muslim-Americans and others forgot about the horror stories of US war crimes and complicities in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Palestine.

I have been very outspoken in my criticism of the Obama administration in previous posts and while I strongly support the proposed Islamic Center in Manhattan, I remain astonished at the way many of my fellow Muslim-Americans and human rights advocates praise President Obama and stay silent about his policies overseas.

It is clear that the ugly and seemingly endless controversy surrounding the Islamic Community Center (incorrectly termed the “Ground Zero Mosque”) highlights on the disturbing prevalence and growth of Islamophobia in the United States. Due to the hate-mongering initiated by Islamophobic bigots and propagandists, an enormous body of literature, especially on the blogosphere, exists about what has become a nationwide debate. Muslim-Americans, inter-faith leaders, and representatives of anti-racist organizations continue to speak up and condemn the shameful anti-Muslim smear campaign perpetuated by right-wing Republicans and others.

Former speaker of the US House of Representatives Newt Gingrich recently called supporters of the Islamic Center “radical Islamists” and likened them to Nazis. Gingrich then went on and stated, “We would never accept the Japanese putting up a site next to Pearl Harbor.” Equating the entire Muslim population with Nazis and radical extremists is more dangerous than it is insulting, as it undoubtedly fuels the Orientalist perception of Muslims being suspicious, untrustworthy, and the threatening “Other.” Carl Paladino, Republican candidate for the governor of New York, added to Gingrich’s alarmist assertions with the following ludicrous statement: “The Ground Zero Mosque is not about freedom of religion, as President Obama claims. It’s about the murderous ideology behind the attacks on our country and the fanatics our troops are fighting every day in Middle East.” His ignorant comments are reflective of the countless Republicans who have joined the hate choir in demonizing Islam and linking the religion with terrorism.

But this debate is not so clear-cut either. The so-called “Anti-Defamation League (ADL)”, which claims to “stop the defamation of the Jewish people” and “secure justice and fair treatment to all citizens alike,” released a statement in late July to oppose the Islamic Center’s construction. The announcement prompted Muslims and Jewish representatives from Mt. Airy’s “Shalom Center” to rally in support of the Islamic Center and condemn the ADL’s hypocrisy. Meanwhile, Democrats such as John Hall, Tim Bishop, and Mike McMahon oppose the project, calling it “insensitive” to the “families of 9/11,” as if Muslim-Americans are responsible for the attacks and didn’t die on 9/11, too.

With such ignorance and nationalistic xenophobia during a time when Islamophobia is becoming more and more deeply rooted in the hearts of non-Muslim Americans, it is understandable and correct for Muslim-Americans to expect their President to defend religious liberty. However, when Obama escalates military presence in Afghanistan, widens drone attacks in Pakistan, and fails to hold Israel accountable for its war crimes against the Palestinians, to what extent are we comfortable with praising the President while disregarding US atrocities? That is, have Muslim-Americans and self-proclaimed anti-racist/anti-war/anti-oppression activists become so self-absorbed that we exclusively care about our civil liberties and not the rights of those victimized by the Obama administration’s military campaigns in Muslim-majority countries?

Before discussing his international policies, I want to address what happened on Saturday, a day after Obama made it “clear” about backing the Islamic Center. The President told reporters, “I was not commenting, and I will not comment, on the wisdom of making a decision to put a Mosque there.” Aside from wrongly describing the building as a Mosque, Obama once again revealed his attempts to appease both sides of the debate. Though he “supports” the right for Muslims to build an Islamic Center in the proposed location (which is not at Ground Zero), he refuses to endorse it. One must question why Obama doesn’t endorse the project? If he believes Muslims are not responsible for the 9/11 attacks and that the association between “Islam” and “terrorism” is abhorrent, then why refuse to comment on the “wisdom” of building an Islamic Center? Also, why is the Islamophobia surrounding this controversy not addressed? Palestinian-American journalist Ali Abunimah writes:

What the critics are engaged in is collective vilification, delegitimization and incitement against Muslims in the United States and they are doing it deliberately and for political purposes. This is what needs to be recognized and confronted and sadly I do not see the president or any other senior politicians in the United States doing that… Muslims may have the legal freedom to exercise their religion in the US — and they do despite increasing efforts to use laws and regulations to prevent the building of mosques — but what is that freedom worth if they live in a climate of increasing fear, vilification and hatred?

Abunimah also points out that the ADL’s Abe Foxman and even Sarah Palin did not challenge the right to build an Islamic Center, but certainly opposed the idea. Defending civil rights is important, but pretending that Obama has championed the exhaustive and heated debates against Islamophobes ever since this controversy started would be to overlook his vague remarks on Saturday, as well as the hard work of Muslim and non-Muslim activists.

At present, Obama is still upheld as the “anti-war President.” The constant promotion of Obama as someone who “understands” Islam, “reaches out” and offers a “new beginning” to the “Muslim world” replays like advertisement and it serves as a powerful tool to justify and conceal his war crimes. Surely, after citing Qur’anic verses, Persian poets, and Turkish proverbs, Obama must be helping the people of Afghanistan and Pakistan; he’s only killing the “terrorists,” right?

In June, United Nations human rights official Philip Alston urged the CIA to cease its drone operations in northwest Pakistan and accused it of potentially generating a “Playstation” mentality towards killing. In his report, Alston concluded that “CIA personnel could be prosecuted for murder under the domestic law of any country in which they conduct targeted killings, and could also be prosecuted for violations of applicable US law.”

While exact numbers of Pakistani causalities vary, all reports agree the death toll is high. According to a study published in February 2010 by “The New America Foundation,” between 413 and 709 Pakistanis were killed in drone strikes in 2009, while 278-465 (and counting) were killed in 2010.  As Pakistani-British author and political commentator Tariq Ali states, President Obama has ordered more troops and drone attacks in Afghanistan and Pakistan, respectively, than Bush ever did. Given that no evidence has been provided that these drone campaigns are actually working, let’s ask some human questions: How many of these hundreds are “terrorists”? How does bombing people promote peace and stability? Are people expected to forget the pain and trauma when their family members and Loved ones are bombed?  Is there really no expectation for retaliation?

In Afghanistan, the condition for Afghans, especially women, has worsened under US military occupation. When asked to comment on the controversial “Time Magazine” cover featuring an 18 year-old Afghan woman with her nose cut off, Afghan feminist-activist Malalai Joya stressed that the atrocity occurred under western occupation and that such violence has increased since the US invasion. Joya explained to reporters:

During the Taliban’s regime such atrocities weren’t as rife as it is now and the graph is hiking each day. Eighteen-year-old Aisha is just an example and cutting ears, noses and toes, torturing and even slaughtering is a norm in Afghanistan. Currently, Afghan people, especially women, are squashed between three enemies: Taliban, fundamentalist warlords and troops.

Along with Anushay Hossain, Joya condemned the US media’s exploitation of Afghan women, calling it an attempt to use the plight of Afghan women as an emotional propaganda tool to garner support for an unpopular war. RAWA News claims that Wikileaks published a document in March that outlined the CIA’s strategy to use the condition of Afghan women to counter opposition against the war in Europe and the US. Such images, indeed, provoke strong emotional responses, but if the US media wants us to really care about Afghan women, then what about the US soldiers that raided an Afghan home in February and killed three innocent women – two of whom were pregnant – and then tried to hide the evidence by digging the bullets out of the dead bodies? Will these images be published by “Time Magazine” or are the images only powerful when Afghans commit the atrocities?

Yet despite the predator drones in Pakistan, the troop surge in Afghanistan, the torture and prisoner abuse in Bagram, occupation in Iraq, and the silence on Israeli war crimes, protests against Obama’s wars and complicities aren’t nearly as large as the anti-war protests during Bush’s term. Why? Also, criticism of Obama is often shut down as “hateful,” “anti-American,” and “pessimistic” or “cynical.” As an anti-racist activist, I do recognize the ugliness of racism in our country and how a lot of White supremacists direct their rage at Obama, but my criticism of the President is based on the principles of fundamental human rights and anti-imperialism. It continues to surprise me whenever I encounter people who get incredibly defensive to criticism of Obama. There was one instance when a fellow Muslim told me, “If you hate America so much, then go back to your country! I’m an American, I’m proud of my country and my President!” Not only was I stunned to hear xenophobia from a fellow Muslim, but I also thought about how I heard similar remarks made by the pro-Bush crowd.

Dismissing, vilifying, or even censoring criticism of Barack Obama not only discourages diligent questioning of authority and our responsibility as human beings, but it also works a way to overlook the realities and consequences of US war crimes and complicities in the aforementioned countries. When I am asked, “Would you rather prefer McCain as President?” I find that problematic for many reasons. Firstly, it says Obama was the “lesser of two evils,” and secondly, it doesn’t encourage us to hold our leaders responsible for their wrongs. If we all elected Obama, then wouldn’t it be more productive to speak out against the war crimes instead of smoke-screening them? When someone challenges Obama’s policies, what is the point of getting overly defensive other than seeking to shut that person up? If we believe Obama is the “better President” or the “less racist President,” does that mean we should excuse the people murdered in his wars? Muslim feminist-activist Shaista Patel comments:

With a family in Pakistan, and friends in Northern Pakistan, some of whom have lost their loved ones to the US airstrikes, it’s hard to digest this ‘better’ Obama. I am not appropriating the pain of the people there by sharing this, but I am from there and I am from here too; invested in the hope of my President doing something for us but knowing full well that he’s killing my people across the oceans. We think that better times are here and that we have the support of Obama, a President much better than the last one, which Pakistanis, Gazans, Afghans and Iraqis will tell us is not the case.

Even worse, as I write this now, over 20 million people are suffering from the devastating floods in Pakistan. Mark LeVine of Al Jazeera English wrote a powerful piece yesterday that called for relief boosts in Pakistan and an urgency for Obama to call a ceasefire. Outraged at American and Pakistani officials for pledging to continue war in Pakistan, LeVine writes:

Over the weekend US missiles killed 12 people. Meanwhile, 19 American helicopters are currently involved in the rescue efforts. Precisely what kind of message does that send? “We are not going to give much to help you stay alive, but we will make sure to continue killing you during this time of greatest need.”

What is startling is how the Obama administration spends $12 billion a month to fight the Taliban. Compare that amount to the $460 million requested by the UN to help aid the 20 million Pakistanis. In other words, the money Obama spends on war in Afghanistan and Pakistan is actually 25-times the amount needed to aid Pakistan. When we know our government can help another nation in its time of desperate need, why do we not express outrage the same way we did when Bush was in office?

As Muslim-Americans, Islamophobia is a reality that confronts us at home and it is important for our communities and allies to speak out against it, but at the same time, if we really care about human rights, we should also condemn the war crimes committed by our government. Before we got over-excited about Obama wishing Muslims a “Happy Ramadan,” let us be conscious of the people being killed by US missiles, occupying military forces, and US-funded weapons, tanks and jets in Israel.  I do not deny that Muslim-majority countries are plagued by corrupt governments and aren’t doing enough to help their fellow nations, but since criticism of Obama from our communities is often marginalized, it is important we realize that the US military presence and intervention in the rest of the world is part of the problem, not the solution.

Real “change” means there is always progress to be made. Nothing changes if we stay silent.

15 thoughts on “Smoke Screening President Obama’s War Crimes

  1. As Jean Marie Gustave Le Clezio’s Nobel speech goes:

    If there is one virtue which the writer’s pen must always have, it is that it must never be used to praise the powerful, even with the faintest of scribblings.

    …except I think that instead of the writer’s pen we can substitute “the citizen’s voice.”

    People definitely need to get over Obama, look past his media smokescreen, and start thinking a little more critically, and taking more action in their own communities, that is, participating in, feeding, and learning about their communities, and not this stupid alienating tea-partying.

    Thanks so much for this post, Jehaz!

  2. Good post. it’s easy to get so wrapped up in partisan bickering that you forget to focus on what is right, over what is your position. however, i think there is also something to be said about the success obama has had so far in office. he has focused on a lot (healthcare, stimulus, etc.) and with the time that he has had, he has accomplished a lot. not enough, but a lot. he has also been our first president in some time to rebuke israel for their actions (mildly, but a rebuke still). i believe he has a plan to get to some of these things you discuss above.

    there’s a lot to do, and to expect him to achieve all of the objectives we lay out for him is unreasonable. but the last combat troops were pulled out of iraq this week. that’s something. the u.s. and britain are the countries that are helping pakistani flood victims the most in the world right now, and that is something. i’m not trying to defend his faults, because he has a lot of very serious ones, i’m just trying to say maybe you’re setting the bar a little high. he can’t solve any of those crises tomorrow, i don’t think anybody can. but i do think that they are on his agenda.

    • Musab,

      I understand the importance of taking care of issues at home, but what exactly is the US doing in Afghanistan and Pakistan. And how is bombing the hell out of people going to bring peace and stability?

      What about the families and Loved ones of dead Pakistanis, Afghans, Iraqis, and Gazans — think about their perception of Obama. I think Muslim-Americans need to be aware of their privileges and rather than focusing exclusively on ourselves, we should be conscious of US war crimes. Just look at the death toll I provided. That is something.

      I didn’t know caring about human life was “setting the bar a little high.” I’m not saying I expect him to solve everything. What I’m saying is that we hold him accountable instead of staying silent.

  3. Obama, till date has been a massive disappointment for the general public in America and for the change expected by the rest of the world. I for one, never believed Obama was a man for change.

    A wise man once explained to me that the capitalism government is like a bus but the drives change – meaning the bus is the same, the route it take you on is the same but when new leaders are elected they are simply the new bus driver – but everything else stays the same.

    • Well said. Thank you for your comment! Admittedly, I thought Obama was going to bring “change.” After the drone operations started in Pakistan, I couldn’t fool myself anymore. I couldn’t make excuses for him. What’s wrong is wrong, no matter who does it or who says it, as Malcolm X said.

  4. I agree that it’s a smokescreen and I believe that the federal government and mainstream media are using it to stir up irrational hatred and fear of Muslims, in order to drum up support America’s never-ending war and military conquest. After all, if we don’t have an “enemy”, who would support a war? (By the way, I am a Christian and I attend tea party rallies to protest loss of civil liberties. We must treat people as individuals and not make sweeping judgments about groups of people. It’s very easy to do and I’m ashamed to admit that I have done that in the past. Trying to amend my ways!)

  5. I don’t understand why people say “if you hate America so much, go back yo your own country.” I would assume that’s part of America, is being allowed to criticize your own government when they’re doing something that’s clearly wrong. Criticizing the government doesn’t equal hate.

    And by the way, awesome post. I don’t know what’s wrong with people sometimes.

    • Thanks RenKiss. It continues to surprise me how defensive people are of Obama. That wasn’t the only encounter I had with someone getting hyper-sensitive to criticism of the president.

      It’s interesting because these same individuals are so comfortable criticizing the corrupt governments in Muslim-majority countries — and rightfully so — but to ignore US war crimes, exploitation, and complicities is just irresponsible.

  6. Jehanzeb–this is an important and brilliant post. I want to come back and comment substantively when I have read the links.

    For now, and off topic but fun, I just wanted you and your readers to know about a post I just did, with an interesting theme for which they can contribute their own creations, and I will post them:

    Fun with Food Art–Foodies and Photographers Do Your Thing!

    I hope you and others will read, enjoy, comment, and contribute!

    I will be back, and with a link that is the best explanation I have ever read about why I have never liked Obama as much as I wanted to, or as much as our ideas matched on ontheissues.org (a great site, especially during elections).

  7. I don’t really think any US President can bring change from within the system… change comes from below, to the left. I didn’t really ever think he would bring change, but I did think his election was important symbolically.

  8. Let me preface my type-banter with the following; I am a middle-aged American mutt. I am half Jew, part French, Dutch and English.
    I agree totally with what this article discusses and I believe the majority of Americans that I know agree with me completely.

    What all sides need to realize is the elephant in the room is
    money, greed and the elitist agendas.

    For example, Palestine. Israel was given land illegally by Nations that had no say in who owned that land. America and the UK namely.

    Almost as if following a script or making it seem as though religious omens were beginning to come to fruition.

    Next you have the most inane American leader in history. Spending more than all 42 presidents before him and having some pretty suspicious ties with the Saudi family wins two elections?! Takes away all OUR liberties with the stroke of a pen, between him and his controller (we all know Cheney ran Bush!!) they committed more crimes than any other presidential team before.

    We get Obama. Half Kenyan, half white, has practiced Islam and Christianity offering up change. He looked and sounded like change. He felt like change. His slogan was change.

    But once he got in office, it was business as usual. The Patriot Act still stands. The banks continue to run the White House (look at all the CFR and Trilateral commission people in his wing not to mention sterns and goldman). We still don’t know so much about 9/11. Iran is on the table, Iraq is a joke. Afghanistan is baseless and all are illegal under the laws established that outline the protocol for engaging in war.
    My point is religion just like race is one of the many ways they keep us divided.
    We all have a common interest Jews, Christians, Muslims, Hindis, everyone. We need now more than ever to have a collective stance on not allowing this to happen anymore. An action of inaction.

    WHAT HAPPENS IF THERE IS A WAR AND NO ONE SHOWS?

  9. Pingback: Your Racism is Showing « Muslim Reverie
  10. Pingback: (Reblog) Black Girl Dangerous: When the Lesser Of Two Evils Isn’t Enough « Muslim Reverie

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